Category Archives: working girl under thirty


2nd Annual Equal Pay Day Leadership Luncheon: Focus on Origins and Solutions to Pay Inequality for Women

This article originally appeared in the Lawyers Club of San Diego‘s newsletter.

2014 Equal Pay Day Luncheon

The second annual Equal Pay Day Leadership Luncheon, held on April 8, 2014, served to illuminate ongoing challenges women still face when it comes to earning equal pay for equal work performed by men. Though it remains unjust that women earn on average 77 cents for every dollar earned by men, with women of color earning even less, the panel of nationally recognized speakers did a terrific job of illuminating potential reasons for the continuing disparity. Moreover, all speakers proposed practical, applicable solutions for combating the inequality.

Sponsored by Lawyers Club of San Diego, and supported by more than two dozen forward-thinking local organizations and business, April 8, 2014 marked Equal Pay Day, and the luncheon was timed in conjunction with President Obama’s signing of two significant orders. The first was an Executive Order prohibiting federal contractors from retaliating against employees for discussing their compensation – thereby encouraging transparency. The second order signed was a Presidential Memorandum which requires federal contractors to collect summary data on compensation paid to their employees, including data by sex and race, which would allow the Department of Labor to use the data to encourage compliance with equal pay laws and assist enforcement efforts.

Those in attendance were fortunate to hear compelling talks from some of the most respected experts in the fields of inequality in labor, legal and auditing services, and workplace negotiation.

Kelly Jenkins-Pultz, Acting Regional Administrator, United States Department of Labor (DOL) Women’s Bureau Region 9, opened the discussion by offering insight into the roots of inequality in pay for women. To fully understand why, after more than 50 years after the passing of the Equal Pay Act of 1963, women are still short-changed, we must look at the causes. Kelly reported that equal pay issues begin arising even before most women enter the work place. They begin in our education. Because women tend to gravitate towards liberal arts degrees, whereas male counterparts dominate industries such as computer science and engineering, women are effectively, though unintentionally, positioning themselves for careers in lower paying industries and occupations.

Moreover Kelly provided a birds-eye view of what happens as both men and women grow in professional experience and then proceed to grow families. By age 35, she reported the disparity between men’s and women’s earnings becomes even greater. Men who start families are rewarded for being “family men,” while women who choose to have families are deemed less focused on their careers, and their paychecks reflect that.

Kelly’s message however, was one of hope, and encouragement. Her suggested means of leveling the playing field for all included increasing the minimum wage, a commitment to ongoing Equal Pay Act legislation, and an evolving culture, which changes its view on women who balance families and careers in the work place.

Next, Dan Kuang, Ph.D., Vice President of Legal and Audit Support Services, Biddle Consulting Group, Inc., brought forth a powerful claim as to why such large pay gaps exist amongst women and men of equal talent, education and experience. For Dr. Kuang, it all begins with starting salaries. Women often accept lower starting salaries than men. Rather than negotiating for a higher salary (as men tend to do), women in general accept their first offer, as women who negotiate are often perceived as demanding. By contrast, employers typically value a man’s negotiation efforts in a favorable light.

Ann Marie Houghtailing, renowned negotiations expert, served as the closing speaker. She opened her presentation by saying, “In 20 minutes or less, I’m going to teach you how to earn your worth tomorrow.” Ann Marie proceeded to do just that. She focused on two primary areas where women can work to ensure equal pay.

The first requirement for women seeking equal pay is to negotiate rigorously. She recommended negotiating all aspects of equity. Far from just countering on salary offers, Ann Marie suggested negotiating a mentor relationship, work-life balance, and more. She also encouraged all women to ask directly for what they want in salary and benefits, rather than hanging their hope on the idea that if they just work harder, their efforts will be recognized and rewarded. Ann Marie also explained the need for building a book of business, beginning from the first day on a job. It will only make women more valuable, and thus reduce the likelihood of unequal pay in future positions.

Unfortunately since the luncheon, the Paycheck Fairness Act, which would have made it easier for women to recognize and challenge unequal pay practices, was blocked for the third time in the U.S. Senate. Yet, for all who are committed to fair pay for women, this will serve only to provide a temporary setback, rather than a complete roadblock. Events such as the 2014 Equal Pay Day luncheon will only help us to pave the way to a more fair system, through educating all employees on ways to ensure equal pay.

Personally, I couldn’t have been more honored to be in attendance amongst so many brilliant minds, all working towards the unified goal of equal pay for all people, regardless of sex or color. The luncheon certainly brought to mind the cliché that ‘Rome wasn’t built in a day,’ and thus even with recent setbacks, we are bit by bit, laying a solid foundation for a fair future.



Out of the Basement and Into a High Rise

small-business-office

Today’s young entrepreneurs are more cautious with their time and money compared to previous generations; therefore working from home is a common situation for the average millennial. But when are they ready to move operations from the basement to a brick and mortar location? Check out three telltale signs of a successfully growing business and three important pitfalls to avoid during the transition.

Read more at hughesmarino.com!



Making Your Office Into A Second Home

hughes-marino-headquarters

When we spend so much time at the office, it becomes our home away from home. So it’s definitely worth putting in a little extra effort in creating a more comfortable and personal environment. Studies have also shown that an inviting workplace boosts productivity and inspires creativity. Check out four ways to make your own home-like office environment.

Read more at hughesmarino.com!



On The Radar: What’s on the Horizon for Makers Quarter

makers-quarter-1

At the eastern edge of downtown San Diego, Makers Quarter is already becoming a new hotspot for young, urban trendsetters. From film festival events and craft beer tastings to art galleries and community gardens, “This is a melting pot where creative culture brings to life a collaborative community…” But what’s happening in this historic neighborhood now is just a preview of what is sure to come.

Read more at HughesMarino.com!



How To Work with Millennials: A Millennial’s Perspective

working-with-millennials

There is no shortage of articles that have been written by highly regarded publications offering advice on “How to work with Millennials.” It’s understandable. We’re a new generation, we’re the largest generation since the baby boomers, and we’re the first generation born into an online, “all-of-the-time” kind of world. Yes, we’re different from previous generations, but previous generations were different from those who came before them. All generations grow and evolve – and ours is too.

What is surprising about most of the tips for working with Millennials is that they tend to focus on the negative stereotypes and character traits of Millennials. Perhaps instead of focusing on the negative aspects – and begrudgingly accepting Millennials into the workplace – it’s time to look for the positive traits that Millennials bring to a company’s productivity, culture, and growth (Hint: we’re innovative, efficient and creative, to name a few).

With that in mind, here’s a positive way of looking at how to work with this younger generation, and how to appreciate the unique strengths that we bring to the workplace.

1.  DO Ask Us To Think Outside of the Box
We grew up in the age of Apple, Facebook, Twitter, IDEO – and many of the most creative companies to date. We’ve witnessed some of the most innovative products and marketing campaigns in history, and we’re not afraid to think outside of the box. Ask us to get creative – we’d love the challenge.

2.  DO tell us how you prefer to communicate. 
Millennials love to communicate via email and text. The shorter and quicker, the better. That being said, we know it’s not for everyone. We want to communicate with you in whatever way makes you most comfortable – but communicating that is key.

3.  DO encourage balance.
One of the key qualities that Millennials possess is a focus on work-life balance. In fact, it’s probably not a bad idea to encourage balance for all employees, regardless of their age. Work-life balance is directly correlated to employee happiness, and happy employees are productive employees. Happy employees don’t quit their jobs either, so if employee retention is important, then this is probably good for ALL the generations in an office.

4.  DO act as more than just a boss – be a mentor!
Millennials highly value the guidance of mentors – in fact, we seek mentors in our bosses. We are particularly interested in learning how to juggle everything, how to mix (or not mix, if that is the case) business with pleasure. The lines between work life and personal life may be blurrier for us, since we were born into a social media-driven world. So we love to learn from you as a boss – but we also want to be friends, share goals, and connect with you (and our other team members) on a more personal level too.

5.  DON’T be afraid to ask us to work in teams.
Education has evolved in recent years to be much more team-focused. And with the entrepreneurship boom – and the focus on working in teams – we are not only used to teamwork, but a lot of us truly thrive in team settings.

There are a lot of positive aspects of having Millennials on your team – but it’s important to focus on the good rather than be afraid of the bad. So, maybe, instead of looking for ways to “manage Millennial employees,” we could all benefit from celebrating the differences among us, and working towards a common solution of maximizing the advantages that come from a multi-generational workplace.



why san diego attracts startups

san-diego-skyline-star-hughes

Not only is San Diego a beautiful place to live with almost perfect weather year-round, but it’s also proving to be a major hotspot for entrepreneurs in the startup world. I recently chatted with GlobeSt.com in an interview, pointing out the many advantages of living and working in the “Millennial Capital of the US”.

From cheaper office space to the abundant talent coming out of local universities, San Diego supports an ideal setting for a thriving industry that focuses so much on the life/work balance.

Read more on GlobeSt.com!



spaces we love and how to get them in san diego: pinterest’s crafty HQ

Originally published by Hughes Marino.

008-pinterestoffice-14

It’s only fitting that one of the most creative websites in the world, Pinterest — a website that inspires millions every day with home improvement projects, recipes, workout tips, makeup lessons and more — has one of the most creative and inspiring workplaces I’ve seen in all my years in commercial real estate. Located in South of Market, San Francisco, this transformed 1938 warehouse is the epitome of tech. With exposed ceilings and steel beams, it is a great mix of the masculine nature of an industrial building with feminine accents such as marquee-style signs, colorful couches, and miniature hot air balloons hanging from the ceilings.

Read more at HughesMarino.com!



state of the market: downtown high rises

Originally published by Hughes Marino.

As we wrap up Q1, it’s time for a look at the state of the market in my area of specialization: downtown San Diego. Here’s the scoop on leasing commercial space in Class A and Class B high rises, and a hint of what to expect in Q2 if you’re hunting for space in a low-rise building as well.

Read more at HughesMarino.com!



new year

Happy 2014 all!

The one thing that excites me most about new year’s (besides my brother’s birthday…and my hopeful aspirations of more consistent workouts and healthy eating) is goal-setting.

Since I was 10 years old, I’ve been an avid goal setter…and every year, for the past 13 new years, I’ve typed my goals for the year, printed them up, and stuffed them into my “New Year’s Tin,” featured below (as well as kept a pocket-size copy to carry with me to school…college…graduate school…and now to work).

photo

Goals have always helped me stay focused. They give me direction, intention, and purpose. Whether my goal was to finish building and decorating my very realistic doll house (yes, I did go through this phase…and yes, it had electricity) at thirteen years old or to graduate college with a 4.0 GPA at nineteen years old, I knew where I wanted to be by the end of the year – and I lived each day working towards achieving that vision. Awfully serious for a ten year-old, right?

One thing that I’ve noticed since I joined the full-time working world two years ago is that it is much more difficult to accomplish meaningful, impactful, important goals in just one single year. Buying a house, getting a big promotion, changing career paths, going back to school…all of those big, potentially life-changing goals require more than just one year to accomplish!

This year, I’ve decided to try something new.

Three-year goals AND a one-year checklist.

I want to think big – and the opportunities are boundless over the next three years of my life. I couldn’t be more excited to see where they take me. But I still want to get a few more manageable accomplishments under my belt – like a bathroom remodel – so stay tuned for updates!

Happy New Year. And happy goal-setting!
XO Star



readynow: suites for startups

Irvine Co.’s high-rises are ‘cool,’ even for Gen Yers.

By Roger Showley

Startup companies supposedly go from garages to grungy but “cool” brick warehouse lofts, thumbing their noses at sleek high-rises filled with button-down lawyers and accountants.

Well, the Irvine Company, the big owner and manager of big high-rises all over Southern California, isn’t caving to brick chic.

It operates 115 “ReadyNow” office suites in San Diego County in the very same office towers Generation Y whiz kids’ parents might frequent.

Instead of gutting the offices and letting them stand bare until a new tenant comes by, the Irvine Co. began cutting them up into 2,000-3,000-square-foot suites featuring open space plans, sleek furnishings and fancy kitchenettes.

Then when startup CEOs are ready to move out of the garage and into a real office space, they can set up shop within days and not have cool their computer jets for six months until tenant improvements are completed.

“Business was evolving in that time period,” added Nelson Ackerly. The Irvine Co.’s leasing manager for San Diego,

CEOs were asking how to maximize internal communication and collaboration and drive employee attraction and retention.

Through careful space planning, the suites can fit most tenants’ needs. Rachael Brown, an Irvine Co. leasing manager who helps tenants figure out their office needs, said ReadyNow suites can be occupied almost immediately.

“We can move them in within a week,” she said. “There are many ways we can get the customer turnaround very quickly.”

Of course, sometimes the drive to be trendy with the latest color schemes stretches tenant tastes.

“Sometimes we get creative with our color scheme,” Ackerly said. “A guy comes in and says, ‘I don’t even know what chartreuse is.’ (It’s yellow/pale-green.) You don’t always hit it perfectly.”

As for generational differences, he said bosses sometimes love the upgraded finishes and open offices as much or more so than their young hirelings.

“They absolutely love these spaces and realize what they can do for them,” he said.

In a tour of several downtown ReadyNow locations, Ackerly and Brown showed off AmeriCapital Commercial’s 3,100-square-foot space on the 23rd floor of Symphony Towers.

“They make the best kitchens,” commented AmeriCapital President John Estefanos.

Interlaced, a Apple-based cloud computing company, occupies 1,700 square feet on the seventh floor of the 501 W. Broadway building, formerly called the Koll Center. Its seven employees enjoy sweeping city views, prefurnished spaces and proximity to an onsite athletic club with outdoor pool.

On the same floor is SKT Marketing, another high-tech company that handles e-mailing marketing and customer lead generation for insurance companies, coupon websites, travel-deal websites and other advertisers.

Brandon Aldridge, cofounder with fellow Georgia Tech alumnus Ballard Johnson, said they sought an open-office concept and did consider warehouse and historic warehouse spaces elsewhere downtown.

“The buildings were really cool — brick and really open — but they didn’t work for us,” Aldridge said. “They were way too big or something was off about them. The price wasn’t right. They were more expensive per square foot. I think we really focused on what was functional as opposed to what was cool.”

He said he and Johnson and their two employees keep their attention focused on their computer screens and don’t yet have to impress visitors, or amuse themselves with frills that appeal to younger workers just out of college.

“There’s no real need for us to have a cool pool table or video games,” said Aldridge, 32. “That stuff is cool but for us, that was not the top priority.”

They pay $3,500 per month for the 1,700-square-foot space that they furnished themselves; they also painted one wall with a surface suitable for dry-erase white board markers.

The fully outfitted kitchen was a bonus.

“I thought it would be something basic, not stainless steel appliances,” he said. “This was definitely a plus. They definitely beat our expectations.”

Working with Hughes Marino leasing agent Star Hughes, Aldridge and Johnson negotiated something more important — a two-year lease with a third-year option and the ability to move to another Irvine space if growth outpaces expectations.

“In case we’re booming with 20 people in here, we’ll need a new office and we have the option to do so,” Aldridge said.

Ackerly said ReadyNow rental rates aren’t that much different from standard office suites, since in both cases tenant improvement allowances or built-in features are factored into the base rent. (Hughes said all things being equal, ReadyNows tend to be slightly more affordable.)

Hughes said other office landlords also are outfitting offices in anticipation of quick leasing needs of growing companies.

“It’s a popular trend because a lot of these companies, specifically more creative tech companies, need to get in fast,” Hughes said. “They need space in a month and you can’t build out a space that quickly.”

It’s also a smart move on the part of landlords, she said.

“The market is tightening in the Class A buildings,” she said, referring to the top tier in the market.

But there’s still 2 million square feet vacant downtown, nearly 20 percent of the total, and tenants remain in the driver’s seat in many cases. No new speculative office towers have broken ground in the central business district, though several have gained regulatory approval.

“The problem is the market isn’t quite there to justify $4 to $5 per square foot (monthly rents), when we’re still doing deals in the $1.80 range.”



Page 10 of 15« First...89101112...Last »

Categories

Latest Posts